Five Tips for Successful Performance Preparation

performance preparation

One of the most exciting aspects of becoming a musician is to share what we have been working on.

This is the moment when we take what a composer has written, translate it into how it speaks to us and then share our interpretation with an audience.

We, as musicians, connect unrelated people through what we do on stage.

What a powerful moment!

How do you prepare your students for such a monumental event?

Here are some guidelines for your students to prepare for an upcoming performance.

1. Programming appropriately.

As tempting as it is to assign or allow students pieces they want to play or we want to hear for a recital, sometimes they are simply not ready.

Just because a child could play it doesn’t mean they should.

It is far better to assign a piece of music that is easier for them so that they have a positive musical experience.

When students are allowed to over-program, they are robbed of the opportunity to have a genuine musical experience.

If a student feels a technically appropriate piece is too easy for them, they are not working hard enough.

There are always things to improve.

Focus on dynamics and articulation.

Can they play it at a different tempo and with a metronome?

A general rule of thumb two to three months prior to a performance is that if a student cannot make it through the piece the first time they sit to play it, the piece is simply too hard to be done well in a short time frame.

Does that mean they shouldn’t work on it?

Of course not!

We learn from what we don’t know rather than what we do know, so it is still a valuable teaching tool- just maybe not the right choice for an upcoming performance given the constraints of time.

2. Practice slowly.

If they can’t play it slowly, they don’t truly understand it.

We don’t want students only to be able to play everything quickly.

How is their precision of the subdivision when there is a lot more space in between beats for errors?

Quick is fun and exciting, but it is a lot more gratifying when it is precise!

3. Start from the end.

Students love that upper left-hand corner of the page.

That is why the beginning of so many of their pieces are so solid!

I love to start from the end.

“End on a good note.”

Audiences remember the first thing they hear as well as the last thing they hear.

They will forgive the middle- although they may not forget it!

Start from the end and work your way towards the beginning.

This helps with transitions as well.

Speaking of transitions…

4. Practice transitions.

We as musicians tend to “chunk” our music.

We play one section, then another.

The bridge between the two often gets neglected and even more frequently, sounds neglected.

This is necessary not only within the confines of one piece but also from one piece to the next.

It is important to hear the change in style and tonality between pieces of music.

Don’t save the run-through for the performance.

Have them end one piece and then play the beginning of the next so that their ears and fingers are accustomed to that transition.

5. Memorize their music.

Simply stated, if it isn’t memorized, it hasn’t been practiced enough.

When we are glued to the black dots on the page, we miss out on the joy of actually creating music.

They have to be able to allow the music to lead them.

Each note should not just last the prescribed number of beats; it should rise and fall with the emotions they are experiencing on stage.

This can only happen if they aren’t reliant on reading the notes on the page.

They know their music well enough to look away.


Use these tips to help prepare your students for their upcoming performance.

Of course, modify according to ability and temper.

The best performances occur when your student is prepared and can connect with the audience.

Above all, enjoy helping your student make connections!


About April: April O’Keefe is co-founder and current Associate Director of SoliMusica Academy.  She graduated from Georgia State University in 2002 with a Bachelor in Music Performance with a focus on cello performance.  She taught at East Cobb Middle School from 2004 until 2014.

While teaching at East Cobb Middle School, the orchestra program grew from 120 students to over 275 students.  Under her direction, the orchestras consistently received superior ratings at local and regional Large Group Performance Evaluations.  Many of her students participated in select ensembles such as the Cobb County Middle School Honor Orchestra, Georgia All-State Orchestra and the Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra.  Mrs. O’Keefe has been actively involved in the Georgia Music Educators Association serving as District Twelve Honor Orchestra Chair and District Twelve All-State Audition Chair.  She also actively serves and clinician and adjudicator throughout the metro-Atlanta area.

Since 2008, April O’Keefe has served as music education assistant for Kennesaw United Methodist Church.  While in this position, she has worked with and organized children’s choir, children’s handbells, and various summer camps.  She also created a barbershop ensemble, taught an adult violin class, and served as interim Music Minister directing adult choirs and adult handbell groups.

Mrs. O’Keefe lives in Kennesaw with her husband, Paul, five-year-old Carson, and two-year-old twins, Logan and Molly.  Paul is a violinist, Carson is just beginning his musical journey on violin, and the twins are enjoying watching-for now.

It All Begins with a Song (Madison’s Story)

Girl with a song

Today’s post is about one of my students.

I’ve taught Madison for several years in different settings.

She is a bright ball of glowing energy and so intuitive and discerning for her age.

The following story is one of the most meaningful experiences I’ve encountered with a student.

I sure hope it blesses your soul today!


“It all begins with a song” is a pretty famous saying. It’s an album title, a song lyric, and it’s The Nashville Songwriter’s Association’s famous slogan. To what does it refer? What, exactly, begins with a song?

I know a little girl. Well, she’s not that little anymore. She’s as tall as me, if not taller! Her name is Madison.

Madison is a special girl. She’s radiant. Her smile is genuine, and her heart is pure. Her personality, bright and beautiful! The light of her life shines brilliantly, and it’s infectious.

And so is her gift.

You ought to hear this girl sing and play the piano.

She’s not a flashy musician. But the sincerity of her heart and simple truth of her message captivates you!

She has something important to say. A message for the world. You hear it in every note she plays and sings.

I first met Madison several years ago. She was one of the choristers in my children’s choir at Kennesaw United Methodist Church.

It was evident from the start that this girl loved (and I mean loved) to sing! Her eyes widened at just the introduction of a new song. Music filled her with ecstatic joy, and it was evident.

Long story short, she began studying the piano with me and quickly became interested in composing songs. It was delightful teaching her how to structure her songs and helping her find sources of inspiration to serve as the subject matter for her music.

I’ll never forget it.

One day, Madison came into my studio wide-eyed, grinning ear-to-ear. She excitedly proclaimed,

“Mr. Chris, I’ve composed a song.”

“Sit down,” I said, eagerly. “Show me.”

She sat, she played, and began to cry.

“What’s the matter?” I asked.

She paused for a second, took a deep breath, and said, “There are so many hurting people in my school, at my church, and in other places. They need to know that God loves them and that they are perfect in his eyes.”

It all begins with a song.”

Madison got it then, and she gets it now.

She knows that her gift is powerful enough to affect the world in a deep and meaningful way, and she’s using her gift to change the world.

She’s touched many hearts with that particular song – singing it for friends, family members, and strangers.

Her simple, yet profound words moved me deeply that day.

This fourteen-year-old girl spoke truth into the atmosphere with such simplicity and sincerity, rivaling the weighty statements made by the most influential men and women of our time.

Are you wondering what her song says? Well, here’s a copy of the lyrics:

 

 

Balancing Music and All the Other Things

Children are incredibly active. Honestly, too much.

When competing with sports, academics, church, clubs, play dates, and all the other things, how does music fit into a well-balanced life for today’s youth?

Here are eight ways to help you keep music on the schedule.

1. Don’t Compete.

We need to understand that we cannot compete with all of the other things. We must accept them, work with them, and above all, embrace them.

These activities are what makes our students who they are going to be. They may not choose or even like all of the activities they are placed in, but it is part of their life, and it will shape them.

Likewise, our lessons play an important in developing the person that youngster will become. Use that time wisely and positively to help shape that love of music.

2. Use their activities to enhance your teaching.

Your student dances or plays basketball? Talk about the importance of moving their fingers correctly for muscle memory.

Your student is a mathlete? Subdivision, fractions, tempo: built-in math/music-learning!

Science Olympiad? Talk about the process of dissecting the music. Those kids love processes!

Reading bowl? So much of our music has a built-in plot line. You can talk about how a crescendo is similar to foreshadowing in a story.

Whether or not your students love metaphors and similes, most will appreciate the connection between the two seemingly unrelated activities.

3.) Don’t make them choose.

You will lose. There is room in their lives for both.

Your student can be both an athlete and a musician. At least at the beginning levels. Regardless, they can love both.

Sometimes, their coaches really do mean that they cannot play in the championship game if they miss practice.

Their instructors may really mean that they cannot dance in the annual performance of The Nutcracker if they miss the first rehearsal.

Making them feel guilty for missing a recital or other performance is only going to tarnish their love for music.

Tell them you understand that life is full of tough choices and you are just sad they miss the opportunity, but there will be others.

4. Help them manage their time.

I’ve noticed in my years of teaching that the students in all advanced classes with sports or ballet every day after school managed their time better than other students.

Necessity is the key to learning to manage time.

Younger students will need your guidance. Try not to over-program their practice time.

Give them quality exercises that address their immediate needs rather than multiple assignments that barely scratch the surface.

Keep the exercises short: just a few measures for younger students and thirty seconds or less for older students.

5. Suggest a time to practice.

This is not a new concept at all, but it is worth re-stating.

After they brush their teeth, before they eat their snack, immediately following math homework, all are very specific and memorable times to practice.

Remind them that it takes forty days to create a new habit.

Providing some sort of visual chart or sticker can help with the process, but keep it simple.

6. Develop relationships with both students and parents.

By really knowing your parents, you can understand more fully where music lies in the list of priorities.

One parent may have it at the top of the list, while the other could not care less about music.

As you talk to each, you can subtly draw connections between their top priority and your top priority.

7. Support the other endeavors.

Make the time to go to the game. Show up to the dance recital.

You have no idea how these small actions impact your students. You may also be surprised at how seeing your student in different light impacts you.

You’ll be able to see shadows of musical ability in your students’ performances.

8. Remember why you teach.

We teach because we believe it makes us a well-rounded person. It smoothes the rough edges and enhances creativity.

Someone taught you to love music. Someone helped you choose music over all else. Be that for your student.

Then, all the other things are just the other things.

Happy teaching!


About the Author: April O’Keefe is co-founder and current Associate Director of SoliMusica Academy.  She graduated from Georgia State University in 2002 with a Bachelor in Music Performance with a focus on cello performance.  She taught at East Cobb Middle School from 2004 until 2014.

While teaching at East Cobb Middle School, the orchestra program grew from 120 students to over 275 students.  Under her direction, the orchestras consistently received superior ratings at local and regional Large Group Performance Evaluations.  Many of her students participated in select ensembles such as the Cobb County Middle School Honor Orchestra, Georgia All-State Orchestra and the Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra.  Mrs. O’Keefe has been actively involved in the Georgia Music Educators Association serving as District Twelve Honor Orchestra Chair and District Twelve All-State Audition Chair.  She also actively serves and clinician and adjudicator throughout the metro-Atlanta area.

Since 2008, April O’Keefe has served as music education assistant for Kennesaw United Methodist Church.  While in this position, she has worked with and organized children’s choir, children’s handbells, and various summer camps.  She also created a barbershop ensemble, taught an adult violin class, and served as interim Music Minister directing adult choirs and adult handbell groups.

Mrs. O’Keefe lives in Kennesaw with her husband, Paul, five-year-old Carson, and two-year-old twins, Logan and Molly.  Paul is a violinist, Carson is just beginning his musical journey on violin, and the twins are enjoying watching – for now.

How To Spark Imagination and Creativity in the Lesson Room

Music

One of the biggest challenges of teaching music is finding ways to keep each student inspired and motivated to learn.

But it can also be one of the most satisfying parts about teaching since there are so many possibilities to explore!

Each student is different, and it takes time to get to know individual personalities and interests.

But if we put in the effort and find ways to spark imagination and creativity for students in their lessons they are much more likely to enjoy the process of learning, and this will translate to their practicing at home.

Here are some creative tips to incorporate into your lessons:

MIX IT UP SOMETIMES

Consistency is important, but deviating from the pattern from time to time keeps piano lessons fresh and exciting.

We’re always anxious to get to the next song in the book or get ready for the next recital, but now and then, throw in a musical game or take time to focus on a particular technique in a fun way.

This will help you avoid getting into a rut of always having the same routine, and it opens up other possibilities to explore and be creative.

BE INTERACTIVE

One of the best ways to keep students inspired is to hear you (yes, their teacher) play in the lessons.

It is beneficial and fun for them to hear you play the songs they are working on, and once they are ready, you can play duets with them!

You can also show them videos of music that relate to what they are learning, and you can ask them to find piano videos that they want to show you.

Another great way to be interactive is to teach them basic skills of how to improvise and then improvise with them, making new music together!

GET TO KNOW THEIR INTERESTS

Many students are happy to go along with whatever the teacher assigns for them to practice, but it is very common for students to want to be able to play a song that they have heard that is not in their method book or curriculum.

They might not always tell you what they want to play, so it’s important to ask.

If you can get to know what their interests are, you can supplement their regular lesson music with arrangements of popular songs.

This gives students a different sense of satisfaction in their practicing and performing, so when there is extra time in lessons you can focus a bit more on their interests.

Using this as a sort of reward translates to more overall interest in piano lessons in the long run.

ASK LOTS OF QUESTIONS – REALLY MAKE THEM THINK

While teaching a new concept, make sure not just to tell them the answers.

Keep them involved in the learning process by helping them to figure out problems on their own.

Have students come up with ideas and solutions to particular technical difficulties, and then show them why their ideas would work or not.

This encourages students to think outside of the box and be more connected to the process of learning while being creative in coming up with solutions.

LET THEM INTO YOUR PRACTICE

As musicians, we’re always working on new music ourselves, and a great way to connect with students about being creative is to show them what you are doing in your practice.

Be honest about what is giving you trouble at the moment.

Show them ideas you’ve come up with about how to remedy your problems.

Students really like this; it helps them relate and see how their efforts could one day translate to more virtuosic playing.

It shows them how being imaginative when practicing helps us all to play better and have more fun!


About the Author: This guest post about staying in shape during the Summer months is by Carter McMullen from the Baltimore School of Music. You can read more about Carter and his work below.

Carter McMullen is a piano teacher at the Baltimore School of Music. He holds a Master’s degree from Georgia State University and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Georgia, both in Piano Performance. He continued his music studies at conservatories in Paris, France and London, England.

Carter maintains an active performing schedule including solo and chamber music, instrumental and vocal accompanying, and jazz. He toured South America three times with the Chase Educational Foundation, giving concerts and masterclasses in Argentina and Chile, and has performed in concerts in France, Italy, the UK, and the US. He regularly collaborates with performance students at the Peabody Institute.

In 2017, Carter founded the Union Square Chamber Music Society, and as Artistic Director, he organizes monthly salon concerts in which he regularly takes part as a performer.


An Inside Look At the PracticeHabits Membership Community

One of my greatest passions is pouring into others.

I especially love pouring into piano teachers like you!

You do such important work – teaching, encouraging, and inspiring your students to learn the great joy of playing the piano and connecting with others through music.

I started PracticeHabits.co back in September of 2016.

And since then, PracticeHabits.co has served (and continues to serve) piano teachers all across the world!

It is a great privilege and honor to know that these piano pieces and resources are helping and resonating with teachers and their students.

The best place for me to serve piano teachers is within the PracticeHabits Membership Community.

The following article and video examples provide an inside glimpse into the Membership Community and highlight the many resources available to piano teachers like you!

The PracticeHabits Membership Community:

The Membership Community includes fantastic piano teachers who love having unlimited access to high-quality resources to share with their students.

By far, the main member perk is unlimited access to original sheet music:

Another exciting feature is unlimited access to a growing library of technical exercises.

I’m regularly adding fun scale, chord, and arpeggio exercises to the online catalog:

I believe that improvisation is one of the most important techniques we can teach to our piano students.

Improvisation forces students to recall chord structure, chord progressions, and harmonization quickly.

Lead sheets are great tools for exploring improvisation. And there’s a sizeable (and growing) lead sheet library within the Membership Community:

One of the most valuable gifts you can give to yourself and your students is to get their parents engaged in their child’s music education.

Why? You ask.

Parent engagement equals success in music lessons!

I’m regularly adding practice guides to the member’s area.

These practice guides teach parents the importance of practice and offer simple steps to help their children (your students) get the most out of their piano lessons.

And, as if the value wasn’t already amazing enough…

What’s a Membership Community without a place to talk?!?

ALL members enjoy a private Facebook group where they can learn from and inspire one another in the important work they’re doing.


So, there you have it: an inside look at the PracticeHabits Membership Community.

Members from all over the globe are enjoying high-quality resources and learning and growing together.

And you can too!

Click the image below for more information.

Student Procrastinating and Parent Involvement

work student procrastinating

Student procrastinating…

Oh, I remember studying (cramming really) for those school history and language arts tests.

Sincerely meditating on the test material, I’d allow my head to fall deeply into the center of the thick textbook memorizing dates and vo..caa…buu…lar…….y….. woooooo..r……d….ssssss (zzzzz……zzzzzz…..zzzz).

Oops! I’m sorry! I dozed off!!

Just thinking about it makes me super sleepy.

The textbook wasn’t as soft as my down feather pillow, but I made it work.

We’ve all been there!

  1. Temporarily fill brain with information.
  2. Take test.
  3. Dump information.

It’s unfortunate, really.

I used to procrastinate on my piano assignments as well.

I’ll never forget student procrastinating the week of piano festival. Oh, what a fearful experience that was!

Served me right, though!

My parents pushed me to practice, but they could have pushed harder at times.

It’s tough to strike the appropriate balance, right?

We don’t want our students to burn out. But they need to be pushed. And sometimes parents need to be pushed.

I believe that parent involvement is key to children’s success in the lesson room.

There’s perfect case study by The Center for Public Education on this topic. It’s not a quick read, but worth your time.

Unfortunately, too many parents allow piano teachers to shoulder all of the responsibility.

Sound familiar?

Many of you have told me that the two biggest problems you face in the lesson room are a lack of practice and parent involvement.

I struggle with these myself.

But there are ways to combat these problems.

One of the most efficient ways is to inspire students to practice with well-crafted and imaginative music. 

Rote pieces are perfect for early-late beginner students because they allow them to play more exciting music since they’re focussing on patterns and not note reading.

There are other ways to combat these problems, of course. But that’s enough from me.

I want to hear from you!

How do you open this dialogue with your families? What’s working for you? What’s not working for you?

Please leave a comment below.

Christmas Recital Time, Again?

Tree at Christmas recital

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! Or is it?

Christmas recitals are just around the corner.

Are you prepared?

Better question – Are your students prepared?

Many Christmas recital to-do-lists look like this –

  1. Purchase food and drinks
  2. Tune piano(s)
  3. Create and print programs
  4. Collect recital fees
  5. Remind parents of due dates and recital times
  6. Extra piano lessons (maybe make-up lessons) before recital

The list goes on and on!

It’s difficult to accomplish these things when there are so many other items on the list!

The most important item being one-on-one time with your students.

Many of you have expressed to me that the biggest problems you face in the lesson room include lack of practice and lack of enthusiasm.

Well, I’ve told you that PracticeHabits.co is a resource for you. A resource you can rely on for helpful tips and tricks when things get tough.

Things can get real tough around recital time.

Let me provide you with one super fantastic tip that’s helped me time and time again with my students around recital time.

Introducing – THE STUDENT OF THE MONTH.

It’s something so simple, yet so inspiring to your students!

They have an opportunity to work hard practicing and preparing for weekly lessons and important events such as recitals and in return their efforts they receive the prestigious STUDENT OF THE MONTH award!

Now, maybe you already have a similar program within your studio.

Awesome!

Consider reimagining it this Christmas recital season just to light a little fire in your student’s bellies ; )

What if you gave this prestigious award away to several students during the month of December and rewarded them at the end of the Christmas recital?

What an honor! What a message you’d be sending to all of your students and their families –

Practice is important. Engagement is important. Your student has worked really hard in these areas and deserves to be rewarded!

It helps light a fire in the bellies of your other students as well.

Now, I used to award a certificate as well as a special piece of music to my students of the month.

It was a win-win, really.

They received a gift for their hard work. That gift was a piece of music. The students loved practicing these pieces!

Love and practice in the same sentence? Wow, what a beautiful thing!

I want to give you something. An award that you can pass out to your students of the month.

Please accept this fun and inventive arrangement of Jingle Bells for the late-beginner to the early-intermediate piano student as a token of my gratitude for your support of the PracticeHabits.co community.

Now, maybe you’re in need of an excellent piece for the mid-late intermediate piano student. Well, check out my original composition That Fall Feeling. I know you and your students will enjoy it!


The next three weeks are going to be busy. Remember to take care of yourself and your family.

And as always, allow PracticeHabits.co to fill you up with inspiration in the form of great articles and music!

Merry Christmas!

Understanding the Creative Child

Let me begin by saying all children are creative. But somewhere along the way society stifles their creativity. My hope is that this post will inspire you and others to tap into and encourage this creative curiosity.

For many, “creative” is a scary word. For others, a badge of honor to be worn and flaunted. But to the true creatives, it simply describes who they are, what they do, and how they do it.

Webster’s defines creative as,

Having or showing an ability to make new things or think of new ideas.

I’ve taught many kids who fall into the “creative” category. Though contrasting in many ways, such as temperament and work habits, they all have one thing in common – they’re unique. Don’t read into my tone. I don’t mean this in a negative way. But in a way that is sincere to who they are as uniquely “creative” individuals.

In his popular blog post 20 Things Only Highly Creative People Would Understand, Kevin Kaiser says this about creative people,

1.) They have a mind that never slows down.

2.) They have difficulty staying on task.

3.) They need space to create.

4.) They focus intensely.

5.) They feel deeply.

If you love a highly creative person, you probably experience moments when it seems like they live in a completely different world than you. Truth is, they do. But trying to change them isn’t nearly as effective as trying to understand them.

I learned early in my career that teaching the right-brained kids the same way I taught the left-brained kids wasn’t going to work! (Fun Fact – right brain vs. left brain is actually a myth. Read about it here.)

I made the learning process painful for them (and myself) through forcing them to conform to my regular teaching style. Thankfully, I learned to adapt my approach and quickly became a greater service to my students and their families.


Are you struggling to teach your creative child? Do your creative students seem disengaged in class? There are steps you can take to re-engage these children and see vast improvements in their learning.


Don’t try and make creative students conform to learning regiments that work for “most” kids.

The current education system operates on an outdated model developed alongside the nineteenth-century industrial revolution. In his book, Industrialization and Public Education, Jim Carl says,

As educational access widened, […] the study of the classical curriculum declined, and, by the twentieth-century, the importance of schooling for both national economic development and individual mobility took on the status of an “education gospel.”

Unfortunately, students are born and raised to be cogs in a machine. Seth Godin explains,

Since you were five, schools and society have been teaching you to be a cog in the machine of our economy. To do what you’re told, to sit in straight lines and to get the work done.

Forcing creative students to conform to a set of rules that vehemently opposes their nature is counterproductive at best and downright destructive at worst!

Camden, one of my past piano students, fell into the “creative” category. I was excited to take him on as a student because he exhibited more zeal for the instrument than most beginning students. I quickly became frustrated when he showed up unrehearsed week after week. I told his mother that he needed to sit at the piano for at least 30-minutes per day. She agreed, and that’s what he did. He SAT at the piano 30-minutes each day. He wasn’t actively pursuing his studies. He was bored out of his mind!

I sat down with him and his mother at the following lesson to discuss a new game plan. You see, I realized that I had been approaching our lessons in the wrong way. My approach was stifling his creativity and ability to learn the piano in his unique way. I began asking him to bring one piece each week that he was excited to play. His eyes lit up! “Really,” he said, “I get to pick my music?” Allowing him the freedom to choose just one piece per week had positive effects on his passion for learning the instrument.

I told his mother not to worry too much if he didn’t practice for exactly 30-minutes each day. I encouraged her to let him practice at his pace – 5-minutes here, 10-minutes there. I saw vast improvements in his playing and ability to focus. Most importantly, I didn’t squash his zeal for learning how to play the piano!

Of course, there were days when he showed up unprepared, and he occasionally had bouts of unproductive activity. But this became a rarity instead of the norm.

Giving a creative child space to digest material in his way is one path to successful education.


Once you’ve found the “secret sauce” for what makes your creative students tick, spread it on thick!

One of my past piano students hated classical music. I mean she hated it so much as to leave these particular piano books at home on purpose before attending her weekly lesson! She would have never admitted to this, but I knew what she was up to. “Oh, Mr. Chris,” she’d say, “I totally left the Beethoven book on my piano. I’m so sorry!”

Sure she was…But I digress.

Now, I believe it’s important for every music student to have a healthy diet of Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart. But if it ain’t what makes a student tick, then it ain’t gonna cause her to pursue her craft with passion and excellence.

Once you find the “secret sauce,” spread it on thick!

I quickly realized that this particular student enjoyed music with a funky groove and sweet harmony. She loved jazz! We began to focus on tunes such as Straight No Chaser, Autumn Leaves, So What, among other classic jazz tunes in her weekly lessons. Her love for learning increased exponentially. She even brought the classical piano books now and again!


Form environments that encourage creativity.

In their blog post Teaching for Creativity, written for The Center for Development and Learning, scholars Robert Sternberg and Wendy M. Williams write,

We routinely witness creativity in young children, but it is hard to find in older children and adults because their creative potential has been suppressed by a society that encourages intellectual conformity. We begin to suppress children’s natural creativity when we expect them to color within the lines in their coloring books.

This resonates with me.

I have to make sure that I don’t discourage my young, budding artist when she’s crafting her Crayola masterpieces. I catch myself wanting to say, “Sweetie, make sure you color in between the lines.” Or, “Don’t you think her hair should be brown instead of purple?” But I must give her space to create.

I need to form an environment where she feels free and safe to explore and express herself. To be creative!


All children are unique and learn things differently from one another. Don’t try to conform the creative child. Don’t underestimate his ability to learn things in his way.

He still needs guidance.

Guide your student in a way that compliments his ability to learn and form a safe environment that promotes creativity.

I leave you with this thought-provoking quote by Seth Godin –

If we give kids the foundation to dream, they will figure out the grammar and the history the minute it helps them to reach their goals and make a difference.

You possess the tools for teaching creative children. You just need permission to use them.

Ladies and gentlemen, you have permission.