A Day in the Life of a Piano Teacher

piano teacher

The work of a piano teacher is so important. Don’t you agree?

Think about the fantastic privilege we have – it is a joy to share the gift of music with young people.

But it’s not always cotton-candy and rainbows. There are days when our best efforts feel mediocre at best. Or when our genuine love an admiration for our students are met with hostility from the seemingly militant parent.

But it’s on these days that we dust ourselves off and continue doing our important work.

I want to bring you three inspiring stories today. These stories were gathered from willing participants inside the Piano Teacher Central Facebook group, a fantastic community of piano teachers who genuinely love and support one another daily.

I do hope these piano teacher stories inspire you, friends.

Aimee Black is a young piano teacher who’s had a lot of “ups” in her piano teaching journey thus far, but she recently experienced one of her first big “downs.”

Have you ever had a day like Aimee’s?

Aimee writes,

“So today my student’s parents tell me they want to stop lessons with me and continue with a different teacher. I have been teaching her for four years, she is now 12, and was my first piano student.

She has a severe brain injury from a horrible accident 6 years ago, which causes her to wear out quickly, amongst other things. I have been part of her rehabilitation process, her doctors have contacted me saying the music is helping her brain to heal. Music therapists have also given me exercises to help her. However her disability barely affects her now, she is very talented and is playing around grade 2/3.

I also attend her band rehearsals every week for 2 hours because it is something she struggles with and needs help with. I take her to competitions (eisteddfods) because she loves performing. This family is close friends of my family, so I only charge $10 per lesson.

Her parents are very into horses, and that is their top priority. They just don’t think music is very important. They encourage her but do not understand music and how important it is.

The text I received said that they want “in school” lessons for her, as she is too tired after school. I don’t teach in schools, as I am a student myself.

I have done so much for this child, I can’t bear the thought of her having a different teacher. That may sound selfish, but this is the first time something like this has happened and I am a bit upset, to be honest! I’m not exactly sure what to say to the mother either.

Doesn’t your heart go out to Aimee? Mine sure does.

Within a matter of minutes, Aimee had dozens of encouraging comments from other piano teachers in the Facebook group. 

I love that Aimee approaches her students with such genuine love and admiration. She’s in it for the right reasons, folks.

It doesn’t make it easy, but sometimes we just have to let go.

Keep doing the important work you’re doing, Aimee! You’re making a difference in the lives of your students and families.

Now, onto a story with a bit of a  brighter hue.

Joy Smith of Sweet Sounds Piano Studio posted this inspiring story a few months ago.

Joy says,

“Some lessons you will never forget.

I haven’t seen a little girl in a month. The family took a long trip to the Bahamas (must be nice to have an ob as a mom and surgeon as a dad). The little girl loves to play but struggles with confidence in all areas of life and didn’t like to perform publicly.

Well, she came in tonight and said, “I have a story for you!” Plops on the bench and proceeds to tell me that at the resort someone was playing the piano. That person left and didn’t lock it up so she thought “why not.” She sat down and from memory played THREE songs!

People stopped to listen, complimented her, told her how nice it sounded and that she had a real gift. She was beaming ear to ear and I was fighting tears.

She said after that she felt like she could do anything. And THAT, my friends, is why we do what we do – why we sacrifice our schedules, higher paying jobs, and put up with crazy parents. Because what we do makes a real and lasting impression in the lives of others.

This young lady will NEVER forget that moment. My joy for her is indescribable.

I love this story! And I can just hear the passion in Joy’s voice. She’s sincerely happy and joyful for her student.

Way to go! Keep doing what you’re doing, Joy. You really are making a difference.

And now onto a story that’s remarkable, funny, crazy, and wonderful all at the same time!

Lael Portwood, a collaborative pianist and piano teacher from the Houston area recently posted this story in the Piano Teacher Central Facebook group.

Lael says,

“I was teaching a lesson at a student’s house yesterday when I started to hear dripping water.

(I’d like to interject something here. Dripping water at a student’s house? Never good. Okay, let’s continue…)

The student went to the source of the sound and shouted, “Oh, my God!”. I walked into the kitchen and looked up. Water was pouring out of one of the pot lights on the ceiling.

I slid the trash can under the leak, grabbed towels from the laundry room to mop up the water, all while two very large but adorable dogs were thinking I was playing with them. They were splashing through the water, jumping on me, barking cheerfully!

The mom was on the phone with her mother (who has the beginnings of dementia) because her mom had made a mistake with her bank account and apparently a big one…

The boy told his mom about the leak but she was already frazzled. She came in to the kitchen where I was trying to contain the leak, the puddles, and the dogs. I told her to run upstairs and see if something was leaking.

One of the boys had clogged the toilet. She ran downstairs to tell me.

I asked if she shut the water off to the toilet. She says she didn’t know how. I ran upstairs to shut it off.

All in a day’s work, my friends. All in a day’s work.

Can you believe this? Wow, what a story! Fortunately, this has never happened to me. Lael, you have superpowers beyond that of a piano teacher. How fortunate for the family that you were there teaching at that time. Kudos to you!

You see, friends, we’re going to have “ups” and “downs,” but at the end of the day, we press on because the work we do is so important.

I hope this post and these stories have inspired you to press on today. Keep being the super-wonderful piano teacher you are!


You know, superheroes (like piano teachers) need resources to help them do their superhero work!

I’d like to gift three piano performance pieces to you. I’ve received some cool emails from piano teachers using these pieces in festivals and auditions. I sure hope they can serve you and your students.

Click below to get your sheet music:

Seven Tips For Teaching Precise Rhythm

rhythm

Teaching precise rhythm is a necessary evil in teaching music. We do not really want to teach rhythm! We want them just to be able to do it!

Let’s instead get to the fun stuff: dynamics and music making!!!

Okay, but hold on.

They must understand where to place all of these glorious musical thoughts. It is one of the most important fundamentals of learning music.

Unlike so much of music that can be left up to interpretation (dynamics, articulation, and tempo), the rhythm of the music cannot.

It is either right or wrong.

Part of our avoidance with teaching rhythm is that we were also not taught thoroughly.

I was lucky enough to take a class called Developing Rhythmic Sensitivity and taught by a former principal Atlanta Symphony percussionist and was devoted wholly to learning rhythm precisely.

That class was life-changing, especially for a string player whose rhythm was questionable at best.

Coupled with what I learned in that class, here are my top seven ways to ensure correct rhythm in students.

1. Have a method.

Spend time thinking about your method. Does it make sense in a majority of the rhythms your students will encounter?

You should know what your students should say, write and think for each type of rhythm they may see later down the line.

“Pep-per-on-i Piz-za”, and “Ap-ple Pie” are cute and memorable ut should be paired with the grown-up versions of “1 E & A 2 – & -“ and “1 & 2 -“ right away, so they are used to hearing it.

2. Subdivide from the beginning.

Most of us learn to start with quarter notes. We are taught, “one-two-ready-play.”

Instead, count, “1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &.” It becomes what they hear when they start to play.

3. Emphasize Understanding of Relationships.

As you begin adding different types of notes to a student’s repertoire and understanding, make sure you explain how the notes relate to one another.

You can do this very simply.

A quarter note can be divided into two eighth notes, a half note has two quarter notes which means that it also has four eighth notes.

This becomes important as you tackle the dreaded dotted notes.

I simplify it for my kids by taking a non-musical symbol and adding a dot to it.

For example, if a STAR is equal to 100 beats, then a DOTTED STAR is equal to 150 beats (a STAR and a half).

When a dotted half note appears for the very first time, teach the entire concept from dotted half to dotted eighth to dotted star.

Avoid merely telling the students that the dot adds one beat to a half note.

4. Turn long notes into their subdivision.

For example, if they have a dotted half note F followed by a quarter note G, they would play six eighth note Fs followed by two eighth note Gs.

This coupled with using a metronome creates some pretty intense precision.

As a bonus effect, they automatically subdivide in their head after having to repeat this exercise many times.

5. Slow down.

I mean painfully slow.

It is far more difficult to play very slowly with precision than to play quickly. There is so much more space between the notes to want to rush.

However, if they cannot play it slowly, they do not really understand it, and they are certainly not subdividing.

Again, this exercise should be done with a metronome.

6. Unorthodox metronome placement.

Typically, we place the metronome beat on the strong beat or the eighth note subdivision.

Try shifting it.

Leave the metronome on quarter notes, but put it on the “&” or even the fourth sixteenth note or second triplet of the beat.

Talk about really making your students think subdivision!

7. Internalize the rhythm. I love this game.

The idea is to have your student subdivide as precisely as possible in their head.

Start with a metronome that you can mute but still see the beat.

Count off for your student and then have them clap on a certain number of beats later.

Start with an easy number such as two or four, then gradually increase it.

They have to start back at the lower numbers if they are even a little early or late.


In our musical performances, we will pull and push the tempo and stretch out the rhythm for effect, but precise rhythm should be at the foundation.

We have the liberty to make these adjustments only after knowing exactly what we are modifying!

Speaking of teaching precise rhythm, here’s a sheet music gift for you to help you along in your teaching journey:

I’m Thankful For You!

I'm thankful

Thanksgiving is a time to sit back and purposefully reflect on the good things in your life.

It’s a time to enjoy friends and family, catch up with those you don’t get to see regularly, and reflect on good memories.

Thanksgiving is a time to honor those who support you and encourage you. 

I hope that you take time to reflect on the good things in your life and honor your friends, family, and piano families this Thanksgiving season.

And yes, these are important matters ALL of the time, but Thanksgiving allows us a moment to reflect even more on them. So take advantage of it.

Friends, I am thankful for you! 

Your support this past year has meant the world to me as I’ve worked to build a platform that honors you piano teachers and the important work you’re doing.

Thank you, thank you! I am grateful.

Please accept this beginner sheet music AND effective memorization practice guide as a small token of my appreciation. 

And keep up the important work you’re doing, because it really does matter.

Your friend,
Chris

It All Begins with a Song (Madison’s Story)

Girl with a song

Today’s post is about one of my students.

I’ve taught Madison for several years in different settings.

She is a bright ball of glowing energy and so intuitive and discerning for her age.

The following story is one of the most meaningful experiences I’ve encountered with a student.

I sure hope it blesses your soul today!


“It all begins with a song” is a pretty famous saying. It’s an album title, a song lyric, and it’s The Nashville Songwriter’s Association’s famous slogan. To what does it refer? What, exactly, begins with a song?

I know a little girl. Well, she’s not that little anymore. She’s as tall as me, if not taller! Her name is Madison.

Madison is a special girl. She’s radiant. Her smile is genuine, and her heart is pure. Her personality, bright and beautiful! The light of her life shines brilliantly, and it’s infectious.

And so is her gift.

You ought to hear this girl sing and play the piano.

She’s not a flashy musician. But the sincerity of her heart and simple truth of her message captivates you!

She has something important to say. A message for the world. You hear it in every note she plays and sings.

I first met Madison several years ago. She was one of the choristers in my children’s choir at Kennesaw United Methodist Church.

It was evident from the start that this girl loved (and I mean loved) to sing! Her eyes widened at just the introduction of a new song. Music filled her with ecstatic joy, and it was evident.

Long story short, she began studying the piano with me and quickly became interested in composing songs. It was delightful teaching her how to structure her songs and helping her find sources of inspiration to serve as the subject matter for her music.

I’ll never forget it.

One day, Madison came into my studio wide-eyed, grinning ear-to-ear. She excitedly proclaimed,

“Mr. Chris, I’ve composed a song.”

“Sit down,” I said, eagerly. “Show me.”

She sat, she played, and began to cry.

“What’s the matter?” I asked.

She paused for a second, took a deep breath, and said, “There are so many hurting people in my school, at my church, and in other places. They need to know that God loves them and that they are perfect in his eyes.”

It all begins with a song.”

Madison got it then, and she gets it now.

She knows that her gift is powerful enough to affect the world in a deep and meaningful way, and she’s using her gift to change the world.

She’s touched many hearts with that particular song – singing it for friends, family members, and strangers.

Her simple, yet profound words moved me deeply that day.

This fourteen-year-old girl spoke truth into the atmosphere with such simplicity and sincerity, rivaling the weighty statements made by the most influential men and women of our time.

Are you wondering what her song says? Well, here’s a copy of the lyrics:

 

 

Balancing Music and All the Other Things

Children are incredibly active. Honestly, too much.

When competing with sports, academics, church, clubs, play dates, and all the other things, how does music fit into a well-balanced life for today’s youth?

Here are eight ways to help you keep music on the schedule.

1. Don’t Compete.

We need to understand that we cannot compete with all of the other things. We must accept them, work with them, and above all, embrace them.

These activities are what makes our students who they are going to be. They may not choose or even like all of the activities they are placed in, but it is part of their life, and it will shape them.

Likewise, our lessons play an important in developing the person that youngster will become. Use that time wisely and positively to help shape that love of music.

2. Use their activities to enhance your teaching.

Your student dances or plays basketball? Talk about the importance of moving their fingers correctly for muscle memory.

Your student is a mathlete? Subdivision, fractions, tempo: built-in math/music-learning!

Science Olympiad? Talk about the process of dissecting the music. Those kids love processes!

Reading bowl? So much of our music has a built-in plot line. You can talk about how a crescendo is similar to foreshadowing in a story.

Whether or not your students love metaphors and similes, most will appreciate the connection between the two seemingly unrelated activities.

3.) Don’t make them choose.

You will lose. There is room in their lives for both.

Your student can be both an athlete and a musician. At least at the beginning levels. Regardless, they can love both.

Sometimes, their coaches really do mean that they cannot play in the championship game if they miss practice.

Their instructors may really mean that they cannot dance in the annual performance of The Nutcracker if they miss the first rehearsal.

Making them feel guilty for missing a recital or other performance is only going to tarnish their love for music.

Tell them you understand that life is full of tough choices and you are just sad they miss the opportunity, but there will be others.

4. Help them manage their time.

I’ve noticed in my years of teaching that the students in all advanced classes with sports or ballet every day after school managed their time better than other students.

Necessity is the key to learning to manage time.

Younger students will need your guidance. Try not to over-program their practice time.

Give them quality exercises that address their immediate needs rather than multiple assignments that barely scratch the surface.

Keep the exercises short: just a few measures for younger students and thirty seconds or less for older students.

5. Suggest a time to practice.

This is not a new concept at all, but it is worth re-stating.

After they brush their teeth, before they eat their snack, immediately following math homework, all are very specific and memorable times to practice.

Remind them that it takes forty days to create a new habit.

Providing some sort of visual chart or sticker can help with the process, but keep it simple.

6. Develop relationships with both students and parents.

By really knowing your parents, you can understand more fully where music lies in the list of priorities.

One parent may have it at the top of the list, while the other could not care less about music.

As you talk to each, you can subtly draw connections between their top priority and your top priority.

7. Support the other endeavors.

Make the time to go to the game. Show up to the dance recital.

You have no idea how these small actions impact your students. You may also be surprised at how seeing your student in different light impacts you.

You’ll be able to see shadows of musical ability in your students’ performances.

8. Remember why you teach.

We teach because we believe it makes us a well-rounded person. It smoothes the rough edges and enhances creativity.

Someone taught you to love music. Someone helped you choose music over all else. Be that for your student.

Then, all the other things are just the other things.

Happy teaching!


About the Author: April O’Keefe is co-founder and current Associate Director of SoliMusica Academy.  She graduated from Georgia State University in 2002 with a Bachelor in Music Performance with a focus on cello performance.  She taught at East Cobb Middle School from 2004 until 2014.

While teaching at East Cobb Middle School, the orchestra program grew from 120 students to over 275 students.  Under her direction, the orchestras consistently received superior ratings at local and regional Large Group Performance Evaluations.  Many of her students participated in select ensembles such as the Cobb County Middle School Honor Orchestra, Georgia All-State Orchestra and the Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra.  Mrs. O’Keefe has been actively involved in the Georgia Music Educators Association serving as District Twelve Honor Orchestra Chair and District Twelve All-State Audition Chair.  She also actively serves and clinician and adjudicator throughout the metro-Atlanta area.

Since 2008, April O’Keefe has served as music education assistant for Kennesaw United Methodist Church.  While in this position, she has worked with and organized children’s choir, children’s handbells, and various summer camps.  She also created a barbershop ensemble, taught an adult violin class, and served as interim Music Minister directing adult choirs and adult handbell groups.

Mrs. O’Keefe lives in Kennesaw with her husband, Paul, five-year-old Carson, and two-year-old twins, Logan and Molly.  Paul is a violinist, Carson is just beginning his musical journey on violin, and the twins are enjoying watching – for now.

Six Ways to Stay Motivated When Your Students are Not Practicing

We, as music teachers, believe that what we do is important to the development of young people.

We look for those moments when the music suddenly grabs the student and they show glimmers of that passion we see in ourselves.

Instead, we repeatedly see students whose music seems to get progressively lower on their priority list.

We know they are playing video games, spending time on Snapchat, building massive things on Minecraft, but, “you didn’t have time to practice this week?!?!?”

Maybe we should just cut them loose.

But—This is our chosen profession. Or, it chose us.

So how do you keep the joy in teaching when it seems your students have joy in everything else but learning?

1. Focus on the big picture.

Not every child we teach will choose music as a career. How many of your childhood friends did?

It’s not really about grooming the next concert pianist or headlining soloist. It is really just about teaching them to love music.

Music is awesome. It will still be awesome if they only look at their music in the car on their way to you.

So instead of stressing about their upcoming recital, stress over making it an enjoyable experience.

2. Small victories are important.

Celebrate the little accomplishments they get with you.

Watch them carefully as they tackle a difficult passage in your presence.

Look for the sparkle in their eyes when they accomplish something. Look for those moments when they are searching for your approval.

When you see those eyes: the sparkling or searching eyes, you can leave the lesson knowing you reached that student.

3. Teach your students to practice.

They aren’t putting in the work at home, use their lesson time to teach them to practice.

Teach them your method that you use to get through difficult passages.

Go over a few measures the way you would practice and say, “Do you know what that was called? Practicing. This is what you do at home. Let’s go through these step again. I know how much I struggled in the beginning learning how to practice.”

Then, go through the same steps again to remind them how to do it.

We focus so much on the results of the practice time, we forget to teach our students how to practice.

They don’t have the tools in their belt that we do to overcome difficulties.

Too often, we have forgotten what it is like to be a beginner. They do not realize that playing from the beginning to the end is not practicing.

They do not know how to isolate measures. They do not know how to identify the parts that need work. Instead, they look at the parts they already know.

Most importantly, they do not know how to overcome frustration.

Teach them how. One note at a time.

Well-crafted and FUN sheet music is a great way to inspire students to practice!

4. Remind your students (and yourself) why it’s important to practice.

Do they even know why they are supposed to practice?

What’s your answer when someone asks why they are supposed to practice?

We practice to develop muscle memory so when nerves kick in, the hands know what to do.

We practice reinforcing what we learned in our lesson.

We practice so our teacher can instead focus on making real music-dynamics, phrasing, articulation, making the music speak so that we and our audience become breathless.

5. Give grace to your students.

Sometimes your students need your forgiveness without them actually earning it.

Sometimes music just has to take a backseat in your student’s life. They may not tell you everything that’s happening at home.

Their one respite from the world’s judgment and difficulties may be sitting in your studio.

Make that time count.

Show them that in your studio, there is no judgment. There is simply expression without words.

Give them that.

6. Realize that it is not about you.

Students are not skipping practice because of some issue they have with your teaching.

They are not setting out to offend and insult you.

While you spend much of your time thinking about music, they simply do not. They have not gotten there yet.

It is not about you or me.

Teaching music is about teaching students that some things are worth working for.

There are no shortcuts in music.

If they aren’t going to put in the time to be the best they can be, you just have to let that go and teach what walks into your studio.

One final thought…when was the last time you really practiced?


About the Author: April O’Keefe is co-founder and current Associate Director of SoliMusica Academy.  She graduated from Georgia State University in 2002 with a Bachelor in Music Performance with a focus on cello performance.  She taught at East Cobb Middle School from 2004 until 2014.

While teaching at East Cobb Middle School, the orchestra program grew from 120 students to over 275 students.  Under her direction, the orchestras consistently received superior ratings at local and regional Large Group Performance Evaluations.  Many of her students participated in select ensembles such as the Cobb County Middle School Honor Orchestra, Georgia All-State Orchestra and the Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra.  Mrs. O’Keefe has been actively involved in the Georgia Music Educators Association serving as District Twelve Honor Orchestra Chair and District Twelve All-State Audition Chair.  She also actively serves and clinician and adjudicator throughout the metro-Atlanta area.

Since 2008, April O’Keefe has served as music education assistant for Kennesaw United Methodist Church.  While in this position, she has worked with and organized children’s choir, children’s handbells, and various summer camps.  She also created a barbershop ensemble, taught an adult violin class, and served as interim Music Minister directing adult choirs and adult handbell groups.

Mrs. O’Keefe lives in Kennesaw with her husband, Paul, five-year-old Carson, and two-year-old twins, Logan and Molly.  Paul is a violinist, Carson is just beginning his musical journey on violin, and the twins are enjoying watching – for now.

How To Spark Imagination and Creativity in the Lesson Room

Music

One of the biggest challenges of teaching music is finding ways to keep each student inspired and motivated to learn.

But it can also be one of the most satisfying parts about teaching since there are so many possibilities to explore!

Each student is different, and it takes time to get to know individual personalities and interests.

But if we put in the effort and find ways to spark imagination and creativity for students in their lessons they are much more likely to enjoy the process of learning, and this will translate to their practicing at home.

Here are some creative tips to incorporate into your lessons:

MIX IT UP SOMETIMES

Consistency is important, but deviating from the pattern from time to time keeps piano lessons fresh and exciting.

We’re always anxious to get to the next song in the book or get ready for the next recital, but now and then, throw in a musical game or take time to focus on a particular technique in a fun way.

This will help you avoid getting into a rut of always having the same routine, and it opens up other possibilities to explore and be creative.

BE INTERACTIVE

One of the best ways to keep students inspired is to hear you (yes, their teacher) play in the lessons.

It is beneficial and fun for them to hear you play the songs they are working on, and once they are ready, you can play duets with them!

You can also show them videos of music that relate to what they are learning, and you can ask them to find piano videos that they want to show you.

Another great way to be interactive is to teach them basic skills of how to improvise and then improvise with them, making new music together!

GET TO KNOW THEIR INTERESTS

Many students are happy to go along with whatever the teacher assigns for them to practice, but it is very common for students to want to be able to play a song that they have heard that is not in their method book or curriculum.

They might not always tell you what they want to play, so it’s important to ask.

If you can get to know what their interests are, you can supplement their regular lesson music with arrangements of popular songs.

This gives students a different sense of satisfaction in their practicing and performing, so when there is extra time in lessons you can focus a bit more on their interests.

Using this as a sort of reward translates to more overall interest in piano lessons in the long run.

ASK LOTS OF QUESTIONS – REALLY MAKE THEM THINK

While teaching a new concept, make sure not just to tell them the answers.

Keep them involved in the learning process by helping them to figure out problems on their own.

Have students come up with ideas and solutions to particular technical difficulties, and then show them why their ideas would work or not.

This encourages students to think outside of the box and be more connected to the process of learning while being creative in coming up with solutions.

LET THEM INTO YOUR PRACTICE

As musicians, we’re always working on new music ourselves, and a great way to connect with students about being creative is to show them what you are doing in your practice.

Be honest about what is giving you trouble at the moment.

Show them ideas you’ve come up with about how to remedy your problems.

Students really like this; it helps them relate and see how their efforts could one day translate to more virtuosic playing.

It shows them how being imaginative when practicing helps us all to play better and have more fun!


About the Author: This guest post about staying in shape during the Summer months is by Carter McMullen from the Baltimore School of Music. You can read more about Carter and his work below.

Carter McMullen is a piano teacher at the Baltimore School of Music. He holds a Master’s degree from Georgia State University and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Georgia, both in Piano Performance. He continued his music studies at conservatories in Paris, France and London, England.

Carter maintains an active performing schedule including solo and chamber music, instrumental and vocal accompanying, and jazz. He toured South America three times with the Chase Educational Foundation, giving concerts and masterclasses in Argentina and Chile, and has performed in concerts in France, Italy, the UK, and the US. He regularly collaborates with performance students at the Peabody Institute.

In 2017, Carter founded the Union Square Chamber Music Society, and as Artistic Director, he organizes monthly salon concerts in which he regularly takes part as a performer.


Back to Piano Lessons Kick Off Ideas

piano lessons

Here we are, still in the middle of summer, a time for piano teachers to rest, and to celebrate the hard work of the previous semester.

Maybe you’re like many piano teachers, choosing to take off during the summer due to your travel schedule, or the fact that your students travel during the summer.

Perhaps you adopt an every other week sort of approach or teach throughout the entire summer.

Whatever model you adopt, the fact remains that a new teaching season is just around the corner!

It’s important to kick off new teaching seasons on an exciting, joyful note, that inspires students and helps them stay engaged throughout the semester.

The following ideas are for you to consider before diving into the new fall semester that is so quickly approaching!

Organize a challenge event.

I used to work at a local arts center (by local, I mean Atlanta-based).

And every year they put together a “Scale-a-thon.”

This was primarily a challenge that inspired students to learn their scales, chords, and arpeggios over the course of a semester.

Midway to three-fourths of the way through the semester, students had a chance to participate in a big festival, demonstrating what they had learned, playing games, and possibly receive rewards for their efforts and accomplishments.

It was so well attended and became a tradition for this particular arts center.

We all have students who have “checked out” due to travel schedules, right?

Parents are not as engaged with piano lessons during the summer as they are during the school semester.

And maybe this is okay; they’ve worked hard with their students on homework throughout the semester.

Summer is a time to recuperate.

But students spend far too much time in front of the television, they play (as they should), and travel. They’re not practicing that much.

Hosting an event, like a fall kick off challenge that inspires students to practice over the course of a semester is a great way to set a positive tone for the new teaching season.

Host small group gatherings.

If you don’t like the idea of throwing a big group gathering like a scale-a-thon, maybe you host something on a smaller scale, such as a small group gathering.

Do you have a group of beginning students who have taken with you for a year or so? (Of course, you can throw this event for older, more advanced students as well.)

Consider hosting a small group gathering based on age groups or piano level at the beginning of the semester.

Ask parents to get involved and help organize the event.

Pro Tip: Students excel when their parents get involved.

Begin the event by allowing students to play a familiar piece.

Perhaps you can ask a parent to narrate a fun story as you accompany them on the piano. This is an excellent way to teach students about music’s emotive power.

Consider preparing a fun snack with a cute music related theme.

The possibilities are endless! Just get creative.

Make the first piano lesson super special!

If you don’t like the idea of any sort of group gathering, consider making the first piano lesson of the new season super special by presenting your student with a brand new piece of music.

Of course, you can find music in the PracticeHabits online store.

There are free pieces of music and exercises scattered throughout the site as well.

One lady within the PracticeHabits Membership Community uses Halloween music and organizes Halloween themed recitals to inspire her students.

I think this is such a cool idea!

Fun and well-crafted sheet music inspire student practice.


Hopefully, you’ve connected with one of these ideas.

Try something new this season! Get creative!! Have fun!!!

Are you looking for a community of like-minded piano teachers to connect with and learn from?

How do unlimited sheet music downloads sound?

Looking for fun and creative technical exercises that inspire student practice?

Well, consider joining the PracticeHabits Membership Community!

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